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Survey Lab Students

Adina Abeles headshot

Adina Abeles

Communication
Party cues, polarization or something else? How people form perceptions of public opinion on climate change

Public opinion has the power to influence decision-making at both individual and societal levels. At the individual level, behavior is shaped by beliefs about how other people feel about a given social issue. At the societal level, policy makers and organizational leaders rely on public opinion to make decisions, though they may often act on perceived rather than actual opinion. In the case of climate change, a majority of Americans accept the science that the Earth has been getting warmer, but they also consistently underestimate climate change belief in the general population.

Anna Boch headshot

Anna Boch

Sociology
Freedom of Speech on Campus

American colleges and universities struggle to balance the constitutional right of free speech with creating a learning environment that is accessible and welcoming to all. Recently, some commentators, particularly conservatives, claim that free speech is “under attack” on campus, through speaker dis-invitations, safe-spaces, and restricted free speech zones. However, increased education and more liberal ideology is consistently associated with more political tolerance, that is, tolerance of potentially objectionable groups that one might disagree with.

Tina Cheuk headshot

Tina Cheuk

Education
Attitudes on public education and school choice

The rising growth of charter schools and the recent rhetoric on vouchers have caused tensions for those who advocate for public education. There hasn’t been major scholarly research that examines attitudes of the electorate in these three related issues (i.e. charter schools, vouchers for religious and private schools, and public schools).

Jonathan Chu headshot

Jonathan Chu

Political Science
International Organizations and Mobilizing Support for Humanitarian Intervention Alliance Resilience: Evidence on China, the U.S., and Two Koreas (2016-2017)

What explains people’s support for providing military assistance to an allied country? Support for allies often becomes a contentious issue in domestic politics, hindering states from fulfilling their commitment to an alliance partner. Understanding how leaders can effectively manage public opinion regarding alliance support is thus of great importance in alliance resilience. In particular, we investigate the effect of formal alliances, common identity, and changing strategic conditions on public willingness to support a military ally.

Doran Dorfman headshot

Doron Dorfman

Law
The Fear of Disability Con: Public Suspicion of Abuse of Disability Rights

My project examines themes such as mistrust, legality and individualism in American society through the lens of disability studies and through the study of interpersonal, everyday interactions in the shadow of law. The project highlights tacit judgments regarding the authenticity of disability claims. I argue that laypeople have unstated assumptions about the “true nature” of others’ disabilities and regarding the motives that drive their actions in utilizing disability law.

Cayce Hook headshot

Cayce Hook

Psychology
The role of choice and personal responsibility beliefs in American attitudes towards a soda tax

Although research suggests that a penny-per-ounce tax on soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) would effectively reduce the health and cost burdens of diabetes and heart disease, proposals for such measures have frequently been met with public resistance.

Nathan Lee headshot

Nathan Lee

Political Science
Can Experts Correct Misperceptions in Public Policy?

The United States enjoys an unparalleled level of access to policy expertise found across a wide variety of organizations. At the same time, the public has historically harbored ambivalent attitudes toward “experts” in American political discourse, and this is especially true today. This raises an important question: how can the American policy process make the best use of this important source of knowledge? With this question in mind, I conduct a series of survey experiments focused on correcting widespread misperceptions in contemporary issues of public health.

Mashail Malik headshot

Mashail Malik

Political Science
Economic Anxiety & Support for the Far-Right

What factors best explain support for far-right parties in the United States and Europe? Far-right parties and candidates – defined primarily by populist, anti-establishment platforms and appeals to nativism and economic protectionism – have made significant gains in several countries over the past decade. In this project, I look specifically at the case of the United States by focusing on attitudes toward President Donald Trump.

Amanda Mireles headshot

Amanda Mireles

Sociology
Perceptions of College Value in an Era of Growing Female Advantage

In the United States, women have made significant gains in education over a time period in which men’s educational gains have stagnated. These trends have contributed to the decline and subsequent reversal of the longstanding gender gap in education. Due to a combination of factors, as early as the 1980s women began to earn more bachelor’s degrees than men, a trend that has continued to the present. In 1960, roughly 15 percent of men ages twenty-six to twenty-eight had earned bachelor’s degrees compared to only 8 percent of women.

John Muñoz headshot

John Muñoz

Sociology
Category-Spanning Protest: Participation and Public Opinion

Some protests occur with clear claims, goals, and identities, whereas others combine multiple (and sometimes dissimilar) claims, goals, and identities. Which type of protest event leads more potential activists to join the rally? Single-issue protests may only attract those who believe in that particular cause, but do so with a direct one-to-one match. Multi-issue protests increase the pool of potential activists, but dilute their claims and identities. This project tests competing theories of “category-spanning” protest on people’s willingness to attend rallies.

Rachel Myrick headshot

Rachel Myrick

Political Science
Secrecy and Covert Action in U.S. Foreign Policymaking

Countries use a wide variety of policy instruments in order to gain leverage in interstate disputes. One way in which these instruments vary is the extent to which they are transparent to the public. For instance, in recent years, the United States has engaged in drone strikes and other covert operations in Yemen while simultaneously leading a multinational coalition to conduct airstrikes in Syria. The objective of this project is to what extent norms of transparent foreign policymaking matter to democratic publics.

Sandra Nakagawa headshot

Sandra Nakagawa

Sociology
How Gender Identity Shapes Preferences for Environmental and Health Behaviors

Why are men less likely than women to engage in many common healthy and pro-environmental behaviors? My dissertation focuses on how preferences in these two domains are shaped by an individual’s gender identity (i.e., one’s sense of masculinity or femininity). Specifically, I argue that men often enact masculinity by actively avoiding environmental and health-promoting practices that are seen as feminine and care-oriented.

Taylor Orth headshot

Taylor Orth

Sociology
Where are the Men in Childcare? Gender Essentialism, Care Work, and the Stalled Gender Revolution

Men’s participation in paid and unpaid childcare lags significantly behind that of women. Less than 5% of paid childcare workers are men and fathers spend half as much time on childcare duties as mothers (CPS 2015; Bianchi et al. 2006). Understanding why this gap exists is vital to addressing other inequalities rooted in the unequal division of care work, such as the motherhood wage penalty (Correll et al. 2007) as well as the care work wage penalty (England et al. 2002). Men’s unequal representation in childcare is the result of both supply and demand side processes.

Erik Peterson headshot

Erik Peterson

Political Science
Causes and Consequences of News Media Reputations

Americans are increasingly dissatisfied with the news media in general and, in particular, the perceived slant of political news coverage. This project seeks to address two questions. First, what underpins public perceptions of media slant in campaign coverage? Second, how do individuals respond when they encounter news coverage from an outlet they perceive as favoring the other party? These projects will contribute to an understanding of how media effects work in an environment where media outlets possess distinct ideological reputations.

Michael Robinson headshot

Michael Robinson

Political Science
Influencing Public Opinion on Intervention: Public Appeals by the Military

My research focused on whether military elites in society – both active and retired – can influence public opinion on complex policy issues like military intervention. Individuals face a cost-prohibitive proposition in educating themselves expertly in every issue domain of politics; instead, they rely heavily on taking ‘cues’ from social elites that are deemed credible.

Seth Werfel headshot

Seth Werfel

Political Science
The politics of private contributions to public goods

Americans donate more money to charity than citizens of any other country. Many of these charities aim to solve problems that could be simultaneously addressed by the government, such as hunger or homelessness. This project explores whether these “private contributions” influence public opinion about the role of government in society. Specifically, does charitable giving make voters more or less likely to support government intervention?

Scott Williamson headshot

Scott Williamson

Political Science
Security or Democracy? U.S. Public Opinion and Support for Autocrats Abroad

My research explores the conditions under which Americans will prioritize support for democracy and human rights in US foreign policy. A large political science literature argues that the American public holds strong pro-democracy preferences in foreign affairs, and research also indicates that such preferences can shape the decisions made by policymakers. Nonetheless, the United States has a long history of openly supporting repressive and authoritarian regimes, particularly in the context of the Cold War and the War on Terror, without facing public opposition.

CSS Fellows

Kirk Bansak headshot

Kirk Bansak

Political Science
Improving Refugee Integration Through Data-Driven Algorithmic Assignment

The world is currently experiencing the worst refugee crisis since World War II. The U.S. has long run the world’s largest refugee resettlement program, yet little empirical evidence exists on the efficacy of different approaches to integrating refugees within American society. Currently, the assignment of refugees across domestic resettlement locations is based primarily on local office capacity, and does not leverage the rich insights that historical data can provide regarding which refugees do better in which locations.

Nano Barahona headshot

Nano Barahona

Economics
FOOD LABELING AND INFORMATION: EFFECTS ON SUPPLY AND DEMAND OF NUTRITIONAL CONTENT

This project studies how the introduction of a nation-wide regulatory label based on the nutritional content of food products sold in supermarkets affects both the bundle of products demanded by consumers as well as the nutritional composition of food offered by companies. By looking at both demand and supply responses, this project studies the general equilibrium effects of information-based regulations intended to reduce obesity, contributing to our understanding of both public health and economic behavior.

Engin Bumbacher headshot

Engin Bumbacher

Graduate School of Education
Scientific Models as Guides for Disciplined Perception

Scientific data on relevant issues for our societies – global warming, vaccination, evolution theory, gene manipulation – is too complex and messy to provide clear and crisp stories that everyone agrees on. Such data is prone to cherry picking, where people can easily see what they expect to see and ignore the rest. Thus, an essential goal of science education is to teach students to be “critical observers,” i.e. participants of scientific conversations that use evidence from real-world data instead of ideologies or subjective beliefs to critically review and evaluate scientific claims.

Mu Jung Cho

MJ Cho

Communication
Lexicon-based Factuality Classification of Media Consumption Data

Factuality, defined as the degree of certainty about the factual status of a situation or an event, is one of the fundamental factors in several applied research fields such as machine translation and claim detection. This project will develop a lexicon-based method for factuality classification based on the theories and literature in computational linguistics. Previous work on factuality and other related concepts, such as modality, evidentiality, and uncertainty, have focused mainly on the sentence level and well-formed language data.

Caue Dobbin headshot

Caue Dobbin

Economics
Determinants of Inequality and Economic Opportunity Using Administrative Databases from Israel

Equality of opportunities is a topic of widespread interest, central to both academic and political discussions. Economic studies have traditionally estimated the intergenerational elasticity (IGE) in income. However, income based measures can greatly underestimate the intergenerational persistence of opportunities. Individuals from wealthy families often pursue careers which do not necessarily maximize their earnings (e.g. teachers, artists and academics), while those from less advantageous backgrounds might not have this choice.

Fernanda Herrera headshot

Fernanda Herrera

Communication
Using Virtual Reality to Understand Prejudice and to Reduce Implicit Biases

Understanding prejudice and the full extent of its consequences is difficult. Unless it is personally experienced, some people do not understand what it is like to be discriminated against based on their race or socio-economic status. Others don’t believe it occurs simply because it doesn’t happen to them or because they’re not prejudiced themselves. To address this issue, researchers have begun to integrate virtual reality (VR) and perspective-taking (i.e.

Alice Kathmandu

Graduate School of Education
Understanding the Global Gender Gap in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Engagement with Agent-based Simulation and Online Social-psychological Interventions

Despite educators and researchers’ concerted efforts, a gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields continues to persist across the globe. Overall, girls take fewer STEM courses relative to boys, and women acquire fewer Ph.D. degrees and occupy fewer tenure-track positions in STEM higher education institutions than men.

Josh Kim headshot

Josh Kim

Economics
Food Labeling and Information: Effects on Supply and Demand of Nutritional Content

This project studies how the introduction of a nation-wide regulatory label based on the nutritional content of food products sold in supermarkets affects both the bundle of products demanded by consumers as well as the nutritional composition of food offered by companies. By looking at both demand and supply responses, this project studies the general equilibrium effects of information-based regulations intended to reduce obesity, contributing to our understanding of both public health and economic behavior.

Chloe Lim headshot

Chloe Lim

Political Science
Covering Congress: The Impact of a Congressperson’s Roles on Her Coverage

Countless social scientists have spent their careers theorizing about and empirically teasing out the returns members of Congress receive for their efforts at policy making. These returns come in the form of pet projects, campaign donations, and future income. But, these payments are partly a means to an end—they allow members to raise their profile at home. Does this work? Do members who serve in more important roles receive more media attention?

Sebastian Otero headshot

Sebastian Otero

Economics
FOOD LABELING AND INFORMATION: EFFECTS ON SUPPLY AND DEMAND OF NUTRITIONAL CONTENT

This project studies how the introduction of a nation-wide regulatory label based on the nutritional content of food products sold in supermarkets affects both the bundle of products demanded by consumers as well as the nutritional composition of food offered by companies. By looking at both demand and supply responses, this project studies the general equilibrium effects of information-based regulations intended to reduce obesity, contributing to our understanding of both public health and economic behavior.

Will Qiu headhsot

Will Qiu

Sociology
Estimating the determinants of trust using online field experiments
The question of what makes people trust each other has renewed its importance in the era of the sharing economy. A number of recent research studies have shown that despite claims that the sharing economy can promote trust between individuals in society, the fact is anti-social behaviors such as discrimination are still widely experienced by certain groups of individuals on platforms like Airbnb and Uber. These revelations have revitalized long-standing research questions on trust. Namely, what causes feelings of trust and trustworthiness between individuals –particularly strangers –and what sort of structures can be implemented to engender a greater sense of generalized trust? The goal of this project is to use computationally-oriented experimental methods that can leverage new sources of data available online by conducting a set of online field experiments using subjects recruited from a large population of users both from within in the sharing economy as well as the general population. For part of the project, Will is collaborating with the online travel service kimkim as part of an effort to engineer trust between its users.
Dan Thompson headshot

Dan Thompson

Political Science
Covering Congress: The Impact of a Congressperson’s Roles on Her Coverage

Countless social scientists have spent their careers theorizing about and empirically teasing out the returns members of Congress receive for their efforts at policy making. These returns come in the form of pet projects, campaign donations, and future income. But, these payments are partly a means to an end—they allow members to raise their profile at home. Does this work? Do members who serve in more important roles receive more media attention?

Scott Williamson headshot

Scott Williamson

Political Science
Attributions of Responsibility in Non-Democratic Political Systems

Conducting public opinion research in non-democratic political systems can be difficult, because surveys often need to be censored and respondents may fear the consequences of providing honest answers. Recruiting respondents into online surveys with Facebook ads offers one potential strategy for addressing these issues. This study will use Facebook ads to implement a survey with embedded experiments exploring how individuals in non-democracies attribute responsibility for governance outcomes across different political actors.  

Tom Zohar headshot

Tom Zohar

Economics
Determinants of Inequality and Economic Opportunity Using Administrative Databases from Israel

Equality of opportunities is a topic of widespread interest, central to both academic and political discussions. Economic studies have traditionally estimated the intergenerational elasticity (IGE) in income. However, income based measures can greatly underestimate the intergenerational persistence of opportunities. Individuals from wealthy families often pursue careers which do not necessarily maximize their earnings (e.g. teachers, artists and academics), while those from less advantageous backgrounds might not have this choice.

IRiSS Dissertation Fellows

Cordelia Erikson-Davis

Cordelia Erikson-Davis

Anthropology
Sensory Ethnography and the Bionic Eye: What it is to See

I am an MD/PhD candidate at Stanford University in the cultural anthropology department. I draw together theory and methods from the neurosciences and the social sciences in order to explore the links between the political and perceptual; the social and subjective.

Jane Esberg headshot

Jane Esberg

Political Science
Sensory Ethnography and the Bionic Eye: What it is to See

Jane is a PhD Candidate in Political Science. She is a Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellow and a former fellow at the Center for Ethics in Society. Her research has been supported by a Graduate Research Opportunities Award, the Freeman Spogli Institute, Stanford’s Center on International Security and Cooperation, the Stanford Center for International Conflict and Negotiation, and the Europe Center. She has a BA in International Relations with Honors in International Security Studies, also from Stanford.

Kaiji Gong Profile Picture

Kaiji Gong

Economics
Local Technology Spillover of Multinational Firm

My name is Kaiji (Robin) Gong, and I am an upcoming sixth year Ph.D. student in the Economics department, Stanford University. I work on applied microeconomics, with a focus on innovation, productivity, and international trade. I am particularly interested in how international trade and investment affects firms' productivity and innovation activities.

Audrey Guo headshot

Audrey Guo

Economics
The Effect of Unemployment Insurance Taxation on Multi-Establishment Firms

I am currently completing my dissertation in Economics, with primary fields Labor and Public Economics. My research interests include social insurance programs and firm responses to taxation. I am originally from Phoenix, Arizona, and I received my undergraduate degree in Economics and Mathematics from the University of California: Berkeley. My hobbies include cooking, traveling, and photography.

Sam Holley-Kline headshot

Sam Holley-Kline

Anthropology
Entangled Archaeology, Industry, and Labor in El Tajiin, Mexico, 1880-2017

Sam Holley-Kline is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. His research interests involve the intersections of archaeology and sociocultural anthropology, as well as the politics of history and archaeology in 20th-century Mexico. He received his BA in anthropology and Spanish from DePauw University in 2012. Outside of his dissertation research, he has participated in archaeological research in Kiuic, Yucatan, and ethnographic research in Cuetzalan, Puebla.

Amanda Mireles Photo

Amanda Mireles

Sociology
The Constraints of Progress: Examining Women’s Educational Advantage and Its Unintended Consequences

Amanda Mireles is a doctoral candidate in Sociology at Stanford University. Her research focuses on social stratification processes at work-family intersections. Her dissertation explores how despite educational advantage, women’s status in the labor market has not kept pace with men. Building on theories of gender, status, and occupational feminization, she introduces the concept of college feminization to examine whether men and women are penalized in the labor market when women earn more a majority of bachelor’s degrees.

Taylor Orth Headshot

Taylor Orth

Sociology
The Male Care Penalty: Unpacking the Mechanisms that Reproduce the Gender Gap in Care Work

Taylor Orth is a doctoral candidate in sociology at Stanford University. Her research employs demographic and experimental methods to understand the social and economic mechanisms that contribute to gender inequality in the family and the labor market. Her work focuses on the causes and implications of the uneven gender division of care work, highlighting the importance of demand-side forces that constrain men’s involvement at home and reproduce women's place as marginal workers in the labor force.

 

Sabrina Papazian picture

Sabrina Papazian

Anthropology
Armenia Beyond Borders: The Transnational Management of Armenian Cultural Heritage

Sabrina Papazian is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology, Archaeology track. Her dissertation research focuses on the management and mediation of cultural heritage in Armenia. She is particularly interested in how Soviet forms of heritage management counter, coincide and overlap with modern frameworks of management. Sabrina received her BA in Archaeology and Art History from Cornell University and an MPhil in Archaeological Heritage Management and Museums from the University of Cambridge.

Jacob Reidhead picture

Jacob Reidhead

Sociology
Intra-Party Patronage and Party Stability in South Korea and Taiwan

Jacob is pursuing a PhD in sociology at Stanford University. He researches the structure and culture of politics in Korea and Northeast Asia. Jacob promotes complexity, emergence, and process philosophy in social theory and social science research, and advocates dynamic networks as an integrated theoretical and methodological paradigm for advancing that agenda.

 

Jessica Santana

Sociology
Entrepreneurial Failure Narratives and Peer Boundary Work

Jessica Santana is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University. She holds a Master of Information Management and Systems from UC Berkeley’s School of Information, with certification in the Management of Technology from the Haas School of Business. Jessica’s research evaluates the role of networks in innovation and entrepreneurship. This work is driven by insights from organizational theory, social psychology, network science, and economic sociology.

Erica Yoon headshot

Erica Yoon

Psychology
Modeling polite speech: Tradeoff between communicative goals

Erica is a PhD candidate in developmental psychology, working in the Language and Cognition Lab, directed by her advisor Dr. Michael Frank. Erica graduated from McGill University where she first started to learn about and gained interest in language development. She is now investigating the development of pragmatic uses of language.